You use reframing often but are likely not aware that you are doing it. When you miss the bus, your could curse and shake your fist at the bus driver. Or you could think to yourself “I guess I wasn’t supposed to get on that particular bus.” When you create an alternative response to a particular situation, especially if you create a more positive response, that’s reframing. You can consciously use this technique to get through many daily hurdles, and moods, and have a more positive day!

Reframing the Moment

You can think of reframing as an intention for a positive experience in this moment. If you feel positive in this moment, that will extend throughout your day. For example, you wake up in the morning and open the curtains. It’s dark and dreary out because of the clouds and rain. Your first reaction might be “It’s going to be an awful day.”

You’ve now set the energetic tone for your day. Next you stub your little toe on the door frame, you don’t have any milk for your cereal and the shirt you were going to wear has a spot on it. Just as you predicted, it’s turning out to be an awful day.

The intention experts say that the energy you receive is what you give out. By reframing your initial experience of the day to be a positive one, you’ll have more positive moments throughout the day. For example, when you open the curtains and see it raining, you think “The flowers and trees will love this rain and it will clear the air and make it smell much nicer. It’s going to be a wonderful day!”

The positive tone you set in that moment changes how you experience the rest of the day. When you discover you have no milk, you realize that you’ve wanted to try the new bakery on the corner. Your shirt has a spot on it, but you eye another shirt in the back of the closet that you had forgotten about.

Reframing Your Life One Day at a Time

Make it a habit to reframe those negative experiences you have into something positive. A fender-bender on the way to work may have prevented you from being in a more dangerous situation. Losing your watch may mean you’re supposed to be more flexible and go-with-the-flow about time. Getting a rejection from a publisher with your manuscript marked up in red could be disappointing. Or you could reframe it as “An editor took the time to read my book and make these comments. I’ll make some revisions and my book will be even better!”

The more positive energy you can surround yourself with by reframing, the more positive experiences you’ll draw to you. Play with reframing until it becomes a natural part of the way you see the world and your experience of it.